Greeting Card Set
Greeting Card Set
Greeting Card Set
Greeting Card Set
Greeting Card Set
Greeting Card Set

Greeting Card Set

Regular price Regular price $25.00 Sale

Set of 5 greeting cards featuring Katie's paintings from Palestine. Perfect to send to relatives or to send to your representative in Congress.

Each pack features:

Pieta

In 2004 I wanted to paint a Pieta on the apartheid wall and in 2006 I was able to realize that dream. Unfortunately the mural was spray painted over with graffiti and I've wanted to redo it ever since. I was particularly motivated by the tragic loss of precious lives from the Great March of Return. One feels very helpless on the other side of the world, watching people being massacred for participating in demonstrations that, where we live, would not be met by such lethal means. Those of us living in liberal democracies should never take for granted the hard won freedoms we have. 

Superfluous Young Men

The subject of the painting is something I witnessed in Balata Refugee camp towards the end of an army invasion. The army tossed out a tear gas grenade as they left. How dramatic!

The title is a satire of Martin Kramer's speech at the Feburary 2010 Herzliya Conference in Israel where he described young Palestinians as "superfluous young men". See this link for an explanation: http://electronicintifada.net/v2/article11091.shtml 

Does the viewer of this painting consider the young men depicted here to be superfluous ? Do the young men consider themselves to be superfluous? Having spent time with several people from Balata refugee camp, I would argue that they don't want to be throwing rocks at invading jeeps. They'd rather have job opportunities and education. They'd rather not have jeeps invading their camp. They'd rather not be refugees or considered superfluous.

Surveillance Hill

A view of an Israeli base from the Ibrahimi mosque in Hebron. With the shape of the crescent on the minaret, the first thing I thought of is that this scene looks like an Eye of Sauron in reverse. The crescent looks like the eye, but it’s the Israeli army base and the watchtower on top of the hill that holds the same all seeing eye position as the eye of Sauron did in Middle Earth.

Blood of the Martyrs

This digital painting has a history which started in 2006 while I was volunteering with the International Solidarity Movement in occupied Palestine. We were sent to Balata refugee camp because the Israeli army had invaded and was shooting up the place. The army had announced a curfew on the whole camp which meant that any Palestinian caught in the street would be shot. We as internationals were not supposed to be shot so we delivered food and medicine to needy people who could not go out. The next day there were two martyrs, killed by the Israeli army: Ibrahim Issa and Mohammed Natoor, both 17. They had been drinking tea on their roof when the Israeli army shot them. 

We watched their funeral procession from a balcony the following day. The way I coped with the horror around me was to draw and paint. 

Over the next few days I completed the drawing for this painting in ballpoint pen in my sketchbook. The writing says "the blood of the martyrs will fertilize the earth" which was inspired by a Diego Rivera mural of the same name. It was spring time in Palestine and flowers were blooming, the weather was beautiful, the sky was blue; a stark contrast to the death and mayhem. I kept repeating over and over in my head "this place is so beautiful, but so horrible, but so beautiful, but so horrible." I showed the drawing to some people in the camp. One man had recently lost his brother to the Israeli army and he asked me to paint it as a mural on his house. In 2019 I completed the digital version seen here.

Ancient Hebron

I painted this in acrylic in 2007. Unfortunately the original was lost in the West Bank. This is a painting of how I imagined the ancient city of Hebron looked hundreds of years ago. A small, rustic and ancient city before apartheid became fashionable. You can seen the Ibrahimi mosque/Tomb of the Patriarchs in the distance.